Eric Mandelbaum Awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

Eric Mandelbaum Awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

Professor Eric Mandelbaum, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate Center and Baruch College, has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The fellowship supports a project entitled “Propaganda and Belief in the Modern World”, which comprises three scholarly articles and a book-length study on the psychology of belief formation. According to the NEH, Mandelbaum’s grant is among 74 fellowships awarded this year, which total $3.5 million in funding for higher-education faculty and independent scholars pursuing advanced research.

Mandelbaum joined the Department of Philosophy at Baruch College in 2013 after holding positions at Oxford University, Yale, and Harvard, and was appointed to the Graduate Center’s Philosophy faculty in 2016. He is a prolific scholar whose work spans an array of topics in philosophy of mind, philosophy of psychology, epistemology, and much more. His research efforts include collaborations with fellow CUNY Graduate Center philosophers, including Distinguished Professor Jesse Prinz, recent alumnus Jake Quilty-Dunn, and PhD candidates Joseph Bendaña and Jennifer Ware.

​In addition to this NEH award, Mandelbaum was recently honored with a Mid-Career Fellowship from the Graduate Center’s Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies and the Baruch College Presidential Excellence Award for Distinguished Scholarship. He also received a Open Educational Resources Course Development Grant from New York State, with which he and PhD candidate Jesse Rappaport will develop a zero-cost, open-access textbook for Logic courses at the CUNY colleges. This joint effort by Mandelbaum and Rappaport advances a CUNY initiative “to reduce costs for students and accelerate their progress through college”, but moreover, to change a culture of higher education in which student expenses are “too often an insurmountable barrier to academic success”.